Born in Pain – David Bowie’s ★

Blackstar-CD—> Deutsche Fassung: hier <—

Live for the moment, they say.

The logic behind this ever repeated piece of smart advice arises mainly from the fact that the past and the future only exist in our minds. The present, however, constitutes what we tend to call reality. Even though we are able to think beyond us,  both forward and backwards in immense lengths of time, we remain instantaneous beings that are able to feel their very existence only when attention is paid to the current moment. But is every moment worth the perseverence? Strictly speaking, there are very few and if modern society has learned one thing, it is how to distract ourselves.  It is often our senses that serve as a kind of crutch to help us back from the jungle of dreams, plans and memories into the world  which we actually in- and exhale.

Compare it with traveling in a car, like a well-programmed machine – for several hours we automatically muse away and it is often a sunset, a melody or even a moment of imminent danger that draws the attention back to the present. Beauty and anxiety seem always here. Death and love always there.

blurs these imaginary boundaries, because it washes us away, drawing us into the ocean of a dying man. Weiterlesen

Werbung

„Itchy and the Girl Dancing“ review on Al DeLoner’s latest album

Mr. DeLoner’s fifth solo album is kind of a shining little star dancing through the wonderful melancholic world the artist has created for his latest child. Compared to „Flora in the Darkroom“ and even more to „Mountains on the Moon“ you feel a decisive difference. Album cover, title, lyrics, voices and choice of instruments – all indicating a new direction. Weiterlesen

On Art, Beauty & Obsession Thomas Mann’s „Death in Venice“ (1911)

Oscar Wilde died shortly after being released from jail – broken, humiliated and mortified. For two years, the crown had arrested him for gross indecency and sodomy. In particular, parts of his most successful novel „The Picture of Dorian Gray“ had been quoted to prove him guilty. On several occasions Wilde tried to point out that „there is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book“, criticising „those who find ugly meanings in beautiful things“ as being „corrupt without being charming“. Admittedly, even with our knowledge about him today it is hard to believe that Mr. “I have nothing to declare but my genius” was really able to stay true to his art for art’s sake philosophy, meaning a clear separation between his own personality and his writings. “He put too much of himself into his novel” a contemporary critic observed correctly. Thomas Mann, one of the greatest German authors of the 20th century, managed to escape such a fate. Weiterlesen